What to Buy for a Green Screen Classroom

Green Screen Buying Guide(1).pngAre you ready to do green screen in your classroom? This short guide walks you through the basics of what you need to buy, borrow, or build in order to do just that. I get asked what to buy on a regular basis and although you don’t need to spend a lot of money, (you might not need to spend any), there are definitely a few essentials that you will want to take a look at in order to get the best results. So, here’s a rundown of some of my favorite green screen apps, tools and technology…


NOTE: This post has been updated and moved to The Edtech Gear Guide, a brand new website for educators who use technology to enhance teaching and learning. Please follow this link to view the full article and get the latest recommendations for using green screen in your classroom.


 

3 MORE Top Tips for Green Screen Classrooms

3 more green screen tips(1)

Some time ago I wrote a blog post entitled 3 Top Tips for Green Screen Classrooms. It proved to be a popular post, so I thought it was time to do a follow up with three MORE top tips that you can use in your classroom when embarking on multimedia green screen projects. So, take a look at the ideas below, and feel free to submit your top tips in the comments below.

1. Add Logos to Images and Videos

Green Screen by DoInk lets you add up to three layers of media to each project. Think of these like the foreground, the middle ground, and the background. Often, we just use two of these layers – one for the live camera and the other for the background – but that third layer can be very useful for branding, a watermark, or even your school logo. Simply add it to your foreground layer, resize it, and position it to where you would like it to appear on the screen.

This is ideal for adding logos at a conference you are running, or simply to add a channel number icon to your news broadcast. Any image will work here but transparent PNGs (images with no background layer) will add an additional air of authenticity. Create your own and export them to the camera roll with Paper53 or search for Vector images at Pixabay.com.

logo watermark

2. Use a Tripod

This is a very quick and easy way to make your videos look more professional. Shaky camera work, especially on a green screen video, can be quite disorientating for the viewer so the steadier the better. Thankfully, this is not as expensive as you might think. The Padcaster is a great setup, but it’s not within everyone’s budget. However, the Makiyama Movie Mount is a decent option. Amazon is full of affordable iPad holders that cost even less and they will easily mount to any standard camera tripod. Many will even work without removing the case you have your iPad housed in so be sure to look for those too if you need that flexibility.

tripod-

3. Get More Green Cloths

If you only have one green screen, you’re missing out on some creative opportunities. Ever wanted to fly like Superman or float like an astronaut? Cover a table, or some sturdy boxes, with an extra green cloth and you can take to the skies with the magic of green screen. When Halloween comes around you can use that extra green screen cloth to have fun with a disembodied head simply by wrapping the cloth around you like a cloak! For a less morbid example, you could try adding your head to Mount Rushmore! You could even try a mixed media example like this one on human anatomy.

fly green screen

BONUS TIP: Experiment With The Masking Tools

If you ever find that your green screen is not quite big enough, or there is a stubborn area of your background that you just can’t fix, then the masking tools are for you. They let you mask out areas of your scene that you don’t want to show on your final product. Simply tap the mask icon to get started and use any of the the eraser or shape tools to define an area that you want to mask. Anything that is underneath that layer will be transparent.

In the example where your green screen is too small, select the live camera view, then use the masking tools to “paint” the area outside of your green screen. This creates a mask that will now show your chosen background media instead of the classroom walls!

Of course, the masking tools can be used creatively too. If you don’t have another green cloth on hand, the masking tool could be use in place of that. Or, as you can see below, it could even be used to show two videos side by side! 🙂

Side by Side

5 Video Tutorials for Green Screen App By Do Ink

Green screen tutorials

I am a big fan of using green screen in the classroom. My favorite app for doing that is the Green Screen app by Do Ink, so you can imagine how happy I was to see these new green screen tutorial videos from Do Ink that show you various ways to use the app. Each video is short and to the point. They are a great way to learn the app, or to share with others that are interested in getting started with green screen on the iPad. Take a look! The videos are embedded below.

How to Combine, Trim and Save Two Videos

Just getting started with green screen? Then this is the video tutorial for you. It shows you the basics of how to combine your green screen video with a background of your choice, as well as how to save and export your finished video. Easy, right?

How To Use All 3 Layers in the Green Screen by Do Ink app

Wondering what you can do with all three media tracks? In this video you can see a quick demonstration of how (and why) you can use all three tracks to make a multimedia video that is layered with different tracks. It sounds hard, but it is easier than you think.

How to Change Position, Size and Orientation of Images

I find that this is something people discover by accident, but it is a very useful skill to know when using the Green Screen by Do Ink app. With a couple of pinch and drags you can easily scale and move your images to position them exactly where you want them on the screen. The same technique works with pre-recorded video.

How to Crop Images, Videos and Live Camera

The crop tool is a powerful way to deal with smaller green screens, or bad framing when capturing the original photo or video. Why? It lets you crop out areas of the image that you don’t want to appear in your final video. Here’s how to do it.

How to Use the Mask Tool to Create a Moving Newspaper

This is my favorite of all the videos. It shows you how to create an animated newspaper that looks like it fell straight off the set of a Harry Potter movie. This could be a great way for students to interact with local or national news and give their opinions on hot topics. It could also be ideal for historical perspective pieces with archive images of newspapers from the past. This green screen video tutorial is quick and easy to follow.

Are you using green screen in your classroom? What tutorials would you like to see next?

3 Top Tips for Green Screen Classrooms

green screen tips

Are you part of the green screen revolution that is sweeping schools? iPad apps like Green Screen by DoInk make it easier than ever to take advantage of the magic of green screen from the comfort of your own classroom. So, here are three top tips on how to make your filming experience a little easier for both students and teachers!

1. Use Mirroring Software

Green screen is an abstract thing for your actors because they can’t see where they are. Do they need to move left a bit? If so, by how much? Wouldn’t it just be easier if they could see for themselves without moving away from the green screen? Well, they can if you put your video feed on a projector, TV or large screen monitor. iPad users can do this with mirroring software like Airserver. The difference is like night and day, and your actors invariably look more confident in front of the camera because they can see where they are in the scene.

AirServer image

2. Use a Teleprompter App

Nobody likes memorizing lines, but you don’t need to if you have an extra iPad handy. Why? There are a number of handy teleprompter apps that you can use to make forgotten lines a thing of the past. There are several free ones like Teleprompter Lite or Best Prompter Pro, but if you have the money to spare, take a look at PromptSmart Pro – a voice activated teleprompter that listens to your voice and automatically matches the movement of the script to the pace of your voice! For best results, hold the teleprompter as close to the camera as you can so that it looks like the actors are talking to the camera.

ipad teleprompter

3. Use External Microphones

A study showed that people are more likely to watch a bad video with good audio quality as opposed to a great looking video that has really poor audio. With an iPad, you might think it would be hard to add an external microphone to improve your audio quality, but it is actually easier (and cheaper) than you might think. I like several of the iRig mobile products but there are definitely a number of options available to you if you are looking for better audio quality. The iRig Mic plugs directly into a mobile device, while the iRig Pre will let you add directional shotgun mics or standard XLR mics that you may already have at school.

microphone

Bonus Tip!

Traditionally, a green screen is set against a wall in some kind of vertical arrangement, but it doesn’t have to be that way. In the video below, I laid the green screen flat on the ground and chose an image with some deep perspective to simulate a walk that not many people would want to take! 🙂

Are you a green screen veteran? If so, what are your favorite tips for recording a great green screen movie in the classroom? Leave a comment below.

How To Do Green Screen Photography on an iPad at School

Green Screen Photography for the iPad

There are lots of great learning opportunities when you use green screen effects in the classroom. I’ve written about some of those before, but almost all of them involved green screen movies. What about green screen photography? Is that possible on an iPad? It is, because there’s an app for that.

Recently I was reminded of the ability to do green screen photography when I read a blog post by Dr. Wesley Fryer. He did a green screen photo booth at the Fall Festival of the school he works at in Oklahoma. Great idea. So how do you do it? It all starts with the Green Screen app by DoInk. The rest is easy! Here’s how it works.

1. Start by collecting the background images you want to use in place of the green screen. You can get lots of free, high-quality images on sites like Unsplash, Pixabay, Morguefile or Pexels. Once you find the images you need, save them to your camera roll by pressing and holding on the photo and selecting Save Image.

2. Set up your green screen, and make sure it is evenly lit with no dark or light areas. You don’t have to mount your iPad on a tripod for green screen photography, but if you have that ability, you absolutely should because you will get a sharper image more often.

3. Next, open the Green Screen app and toggle the Video switch to Image. This changes the operation of the app from green screen video to green screen photography, (see below).

Switch from video to image

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