Tag Archives: collaboration

Spiral is 3 #Edtech Tools for the Price of None

spiral.png

Recently, I came across an interesting website for teachers called Spiral. It has three collaborative tools that are completely free and aimed at 1:1 classrooms. The tools are web based, and work on laptops, Chromebooks, and mobile devices. Spiral integrates with Google Classroom and includes a full set of data tools to track student progress. Here’s a quick look at what each tool does, along with some ideas on how to get started using them.

1. Quickfire

As its name would suggest, the first tool is geared towards some fast data collection. The teacher creates a question for students, (ahead of time or on the fly), and students respond on their devices. The teacher can ask for text/typed responses, or they can choose the canvas option that lets students draw their answers on a whiteboard. Once all the answers are collected, the teacher can share any answer (anonymously) with the whole class in order to discuss it further as a group. Lesson data is saved to the teacher dashboard. Quickfire is perfect for lesson starters, topic reviews, checks for understanding and more.

2. Discuss

With Discuss, teachers can create an interactive slideshow that students can follow slide by slide on their own device. You can upload an existing PowerPoint or create your lesson from scratch with text, images and videos. Best of all, questions or tasks can be added to slides at different points in your lesson. It includes a back channel type option where students can reply and comment on peer ideas. Again, individual answers can be shared to the whole class by the teacher for further discussion, and all data is saved to the teacher dashboard area. Discuss is perfect for empowering quiet students, facilitating conversations around learning, brainstorming ideas on a given topic, or for synchronous online lessons.

3. Team Up

Lastly, Team Up is a group work tool that teachers can use to sort students into groups and have them work together in a collaborative space. Teachers can set a single task for the whole class or separate tasks for each group. While working in a Team Up space, students can collect ideas and build a presentation in much the same way that the teacher does in the Discuss app. Students can work on individual or shared devices to produce their final product. Team Up is perfect for facilitating collaboration and group projects.

See all the tools and register for your free teacher account at https://spiral.ac/

Help & Further Resources

Here are some resources to learn more about Spiral:

 

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Padlet for iPad is Now Available!

padlet for ipad

The schools I work with use all kinds of different devices and different platforms with which to enhance teaching and learning in the classroom. There are very few tools that are used in all of these districts, but one that is popular no matter where I go is Padlet.com. Why? Because it is a free, cross-platform app that works very well regardless of the technology you use. It has always been an website that made sense for iPad schools, but the release of a dedicated iPad app means Padlet will work better than ever on your favorite tablet.

If you are a regular user of Padlet, (formerly known as Wallwisher), you will instantly be at home with the intuitive user interface on the iPad. Everything looks pretty much the same as the website version, but is more responsive due to the touch-optimized version that Padlet has created for the iPad. Simply tap the gear icon in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen to start setting up your first Padlet, or choose an existing Padlet from your dashboard if you have used Padlet in the past and already have a log in.

Padlet for iPad

Adding posts to a Padlet wall can be done by tapping the plus sign or by double tapping on the screen. The posts look just like the ones you get online with a title and a body for more text. You can add a link from the web to a website, photo, video, document, song or just about anything else. Alternatively, you can take a photo or video with the iPad, or choose a photo or video from the iPad’s camera roll. I don’t know if there is a limit to how long a recorded video can be, but the 60 second video I took worked just fine.

Because this is the iPad version, there are a number of gestures that are included to help you navigate your Padlet on a touchscreen. You tap a post to expand it, pinch to resize it, a long press and drag will move it, and double tapping any post lets you edit or delete it. Of course, some of these gestures only work if you have the correct permissions to edit and changes things on the Padlet board you are working on.

Sharing is handled a little differently on the iPad than it is on the web version, simply because you use a different menu, but you will largely have the same options. To share, tap the ubiquitous iOS share icon in the bottom right-hand corner, and you will see that there are a number of apps that you can open to share the link. However, on the bottom row, there are a number of additional options like view/copy link, generate embed code, export as an image, and export as a PDF. Perhaps most useful for the classroom, when your iPad is projected to a large screen, is the View QR Code option. This displays a large QR code that students could then scan with their iPads to visit your Padlet. If the QR code opens the link in Safari, students should see the option to open the Padlet app, (if installed), which will in turn open the board you linked to in the Padlet app.

Sharing a Padlet board on the iPad with a QR code

So, overall, there is a lot to like about the new Padlet app and it is definitely worthy of a place on your iPad if you do a lot of brainstorming or back channels in your classroom. It doesn’t really give you access to anything you couldn’t do before, but the interface is cleaner than a browser, and it works quickly and efficiently in the app. I haven’t used the app extensively yet, but it seems like it does everything that you would expect it to. Download Padlet for iPad here and feel free to share your thoughts on this app below.

The Collaborative iPad Classroom at #iPadU – Slide to Unlock Learning

iPadU Logo

So, our first iPadU conference has come and gone, but it was a great couple of days with around 200 educators from Iowa and beyond gathering together to discover and share the best ways that they have found to integrate the iPad into a K-12 classroom. My third and final presentation at this conference was on The Collaborative iPad Classroom, and you can learn more about that below.

Collaboration is key in a modern classroom. Students need to be able to work in small teams or groups to complete tasks because it is an important life skill that they will all use at one point or another when the leave the education system. However, collaboration on an iPad, is not always as obvious as you might think.

There are lots of apps out there that let you collaborate. My intention was not to cover them all – no time for that – but instead to show the ones that had the most variety, the ones that were cross-curricular, and the ones that had the greatest potential to help encourage authentic collaborative learning experiences.

So, if you are looking for more ways that your students can collaborate in an iPad classroom, feel free to take a look at my slides below, and leave a comment with your own favorite collaboration apps below.