Wallwisher is Relaunched as Padlet

Wallwisher now Padlet

Been to Wallwisher.com recently? If so, you may have noticed a change. The site has re-branded itself as Padlet. For now, the site can still be accessed at http://wallwisher.com, but Padlet is the future, so http://padlet.com will soon be the new URL of this popular collaborative workspace.

So, why Padlet? The developers say it is a nod to tablets as the future of computing, but also an almagamation of the words paper, wood and tablet – the ancestors of the original Wallwisher concept. Although the new name might take a little while to get used to, it does make sense, especially after the site’s last big overhaul to make it compatible with iPads and other mobile devices.

If you already have links to existing Wallwisher wall, or have some embedded on websites, they will continue to work as normal, even once they get renamed with Padlet.com branding. Otherwise the site looks just the same as it did a week ago with all the usual features you have come to expect.

While there are similar sites like Lino.it, Corkboard.me, and Murally, Wallwisher, or Padlet as it now is, has probably been around the longest, and there is good reason for that. Its evolution over a five year existence has kept it at the forefront in terms of features and ease of use for educators.

So, if you haven’t paid it a visit for a while, you should. There is a lot to like about this multi-platform collaboration tool, and the future looks bright.

 

Evernote Updates Terms and Conditions for Using Evernote in Schools

Evernote announced today that they are updating their terms and conditions. The new changes will take place on December 4th, 2012, and there are some concessions made to educators among the new terms.

We’re thrilled with the number of educators and administrators around the world who have shown interest in using Evernote in their schools, so we have modified our contracts with respect to use by underage individuals who might not be old enough to enter into a contract on their own, including specific guidance for schools in the US where we want to ensure that the requirements of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act are satisfied.

So, what is new for educators? Well you can read the new terms and conditions in full here, but the important part for educators is quoted below:

Can Kids Use Evernote?

Of course, but Evernote is not currently directed to children and we expect that use by children will only be done with the guidance, supervision and consent of their parents, guardians and/or authorized school officials. Further, we rely on parents and guardians to ensure minors only use the Service if they can understand their rights and responsibilities as stated in these Terms and our Privacy Policy.

In the United States, if you are the sponsor of a Sponsored Group (the “Sponsor”), including an Evernote for Schools group, that includes children under the age of 13, you (or your school) assumes the responsibility for complying with the U.S. Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) and, to the extent applicable, The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”). This means that the Sponsor must notify parents/guardians of the information to be collected and obtain parental/guardian consent before collecting and sharing with the Service the personal information of children under the age of 13 in order to establish an account or use the Service. Schools may under appropriate circumstances provide such consent on behalf of parents/guardians. For more information on complying with COPPA, see the Federal Trade Commission’s website at www.ftc.gov/COPPA.

If you are outside of the United States, please ensure that you are complying with any laws applicable to you before submitting any child’s personal information or permitting any child to submit personal information to us. If a school outside the United States wants to enable its students to use Evernote for Schools, Evernote will work with such schools on case by case basis to ensure compliance with any applicable laws regarding the collection of information from minors.

I’m not a lawyer, so I am not going to make any further interpretation of the terms as they stand, but I think it is a positive move to attempt to address the use of Evernote in schools, and any possible confusion or misinterpretations of the previous terms and conditions that were not specifically aimed at the use of Evernote in schools.

I am sure that there are already teachers out there that are already using Evernote with students under 13 because they have had parents set up the accounts in their names for students to use, or parents have signed off on generic school created accounts, but with these new guidelines, educators have a clearer vision of what is and is not acceptable in order to comply with legal requirements and Evernote’s  own terms and conditions.

So, what do you think about the new guidelines for using Evernote in Schools with those under 13? Does your school use Evernote with students who are under 13? How do you get around the legal implications of such a move, and would you be willing to share any of the documentation you send out to parents about this? Please share any feedback below.

Reward Student Achievement With ClassBadges.com

ClassBadges is a new way to help reward student achievement in the classroom. The idea is simple. Teachers sign up for a free account with ClassBadges.com, create a class and add their students. Whenever a student achieves a noteworthy landmark in their learning, the teacher can award that student a badge to recognize their success and help track their progress. Students have a unique class code that lets them log in to the site and view their latest badges. No more sticker charts on the wall!

Creating a badge is easy. Click on the Add Badge button and give your badge a title and a description. Then choose an image to associate with your badge from the wide variety of built-in icons. Once created, you can award it to the students you want to assign it to in your class, and even remove it at a later date if necessary.

As a concept, it certainly looks to have some similarities with other motivational tools like ClassDojo, but it seems to focus less on behavior and more on academic milestones or achievements. It won’t replace a teacher’s gradebook, but it could be a nice way to keep track of what stage students are at on a project, or as a motivational tool for a book club or homework chart.

Right now, ClassBadges is so new that you have to sign up to request an invite, but because I am already a member, I can expedite your application if necessary. Simply sign up at ClassBadges.com and then leave your details in a comment below, or send me a message via my contact form, and I will email the site owners with your info. You you can get a better idea of what this site has to offer by watching the video below.

Source: Edudemic