Is This The Windows Movie Maker Replacement You’ve Been Waiting For?


This year has not been a great year for multimedia software. Google ended support for YouTube’s free online video editor, and Microsoft did the same with the popular Windows Live Movie Maker. Although there are plenty of other options for both sets of users, people did get kind of attached to these video editors and not everyone is ready to pay for an alternative, (or switch to a Mac). While Google has yet to make any real attempt to replace the YouTube Editor, Microsoft has just added video editing features to the latest version of the Windows 10 Photos app. So, is this the Windows Movie Maker replacement you have been waiting for? It depends.

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Social Media Ideas for Schools


I saw this link posted on Jen Carey’s blog and felt that it was well worth sharing here too. It is the revised social media guidelines for the New York Times journalists.  I have long felt that for school employees, the debate over what is considered your private life and what is considered public, can be an interesting and often heated debate. However, in a world that is now dominated by social media, it is easy to slip up or be misinterpreted by those who lack context or knowledge of you as a person. 

These guidelines are effective for a number of reasons. They are written in plain English, not legalese. The guidelines are clear and lack ambiguity. They have a checklist of examples and actions to take if you are in any way unsure of your social media practices. I also like that the tone of this policy. It is professional without being didactic and it seeks to embrace the power of social media as opposed to banning or restricting it. 

While this policy was written for the journalists at the New York Times, I think there are lots of great ideas here that schools could adapt and use for their own employees. So, click through and take a look, and if you are not already following Jen Carey’s blog, you absolutely should! She consistently posts great content for educators. 

Originally posted on Media! Tech! Parenting!: Today, October 13, 2017, the New York Times introduced its new social media policy for people who work in the Times newsroom. Not only is it interesting to read — it may will also become a useful document for educators to share with students. The policy clearly illustrates the…

via Can the New York Times Social Media Policy Become a Teaching Tool? — Indiana Jen

The Sphero Classroom Gear Guide

Sphero Gear Guide (header image)

Sphero’s programmable robots are an increasingly common sight in today’s tech infused classrooms and makerspaces. They are a fun and engaging way for students to learn coding, problem solving, and critical thinking. They encourage creativity and are a great collaborative activity for sparking authentic learning discussions. Best of all, they can be controlled with iPhones, iPads, Android and even Chromebooks.

Sphero has several different robots to choose from, so in this guide I am going to run through all the current models and give you ideas on how you can use them in the classroom. (Prices are listed in US dollars. This post may contain affiliate product links.)

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How to Record Your iPad Screen in iOS 11

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One of the features that educators have been most looking forward to in iOS 11 is screen recording. There are lots of ways to record your iPad screen, and I’ve written about some of those in the past, but native iOS screen recording is likely going to be the most convenient option for most people. However, it’s somewhat hidden in Settings, so here’s a quick guide on how to set it up and start recording your own iPad screencasts.

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11 iOS 11 Features for iPad Educators

Apple describes iOS 11 as “a giant leap for iPhones but a monumental leap for iPads.” Whether you agree or not, there are a number of fantastic new features available for iOS devices when iOS 11 is released. What’s more, many of these additions are only available on iPads and that is great news for those using iOS devices in the classroom. In this post I wanted to run through a few of my favorite new iPad features for efficiency, power and ease of use. Here’s what you need to know. Continue reading “11 iOS 11 Features for iPad Educators”

5 Blogs to Follow to Get You Ready for the School Year

Indiana Jen

It’s August… school will be starting soon for many of us. In fact, I have less than three weeks before I’m sitting in a classroom with children again. What does this mean for most educators? It’s time to start thinking about school once again. If you haven’t noticed, I made a concerted effort in the month of July to unplug. This meant little writing and little (electronic) reading. However, it’s time to get back at it! Here are 5 blogs that I follow that help me get back in the school year mindset. Add these to your favorite RSS reader (if you need one, check out Feedly).

blogging Courtesy of Doug Peterson https://www.jisc.ac.uk/blog/theres-no-such-thing-as-a-bad-blog-22-sep-2015

Cult of Pedagogy

Cult of Pedagogy covers everything from the social implications of education to specific practices in your classroom. This is a great place to stay on top of trends, practice, and the emotional roller coaster…

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Book Creator for Chrome is Here!

As you may have heard on the latest episode of The Edtech Take Out podcast, a public beta of Book Creator for Chrome was officially launched this summer at the ISTE 2017 conference in San Antonio, Texas. Book Creator already has apps for iOS, Android and Windows devices, but this new update means your students can have full access to Red Jumper’s creative storytelling platform on the web with a Mac, PC or Chromebook. Sounds interesting, right? Well, here’s what you need to know.

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Find Apps That Won’t Work in iOS 11

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When Apple launches iOS 11 this Fall, they are ending support for 32-bit apps. This means that there could be some apps on your iPhone or iPad that won’t work unless they are updated to run as a 64-bit application. Some of these apps will be updated by developers, others will not, but you can plan ahead by seeing which ones are compatible and which ones are not. So, here’s a quick way for you to find apps that won’t work when you decide to upgrade to iOS 11.

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Create Apple Watch Faces With Canva

apple watch faces.png

Here’s a simple graphic design project that you or your students could quickly put together in next to no time – custom Apple Watch faces. These stylish backgrounds are easy to make and can be a great representation of your individual style, personality, interests, or even school spirit. Here’s what you need to know if you want to create your own Apple Watch faces.

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Lesson Plan for Teaching Kids to Spot Fake News

Some fantastic ideas from Jen Carey on how to teach digital literacy to students around the topic of fake news. Well worth a read.

Indiana Jen

Fake News is the phrase du jour. The reality is that misinformation propagates social media (especially Facebook). With the proliferation of Social Media and the use of Social Media (by main stream news organizations, political pundits, and our sitting President), it will remain a platform for sharing information (including the news) for the foreseeable future. Both Facebook and Google have made attempts to tackle fake news. In addition to their own filtering methods, Facebook allows users to flag and report fake news stories. Google has also expanded its fact-check tools to spot and flag fake news.

The reality is, however, that we cannot expect our online platforms to keep up with the deluge of fake media. Media literacy is a necessary skill for our students to learn in order for them to wade through the glut of information available to them online. However, a recent study from Stanford found…

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